Rescue

Does it matter where your wood comes from? We think so. 

What is Urban Wood Rescue?

The Urban Wood Rescue program salvages and reuses lumber from urban trees that need to be removed due to disease, pests, or safety issues. Instead of sending these trees to the landfill, Urban Wood Rescue gives a second life to urban trees.

» Read More »

Why Use Urban Wood?

When urban trees are removed and taken to the landfill, it allows them to decompose and release carbon back into the atmosphere where it contributes to climate change. By salvaging and reusing the wood from these trees, it gives the tree a second life and reduces our carbon footprint.

» More about Why? »

Services

Using a state-of-the-art electric sawmill and expert operators, the Urban Wood Rescue program provides milling and kiln drying services for lumber.

 

 

» Learn More »

Products

Slabs, posts, boards, and planks: Check out our inventory.

 

 

 

» See Products »

How-To See all

Trees for Neighborhoods

The NeighborWoods Program is your opportunity to grow the forest in your very own neighborhood! This program focuses on building investment in your neighborhood by working toward a greater, greener vision through trees. Work directly with one of our expert Community Foresters to plant the right trees in the right places throughout your neighborhood and maximize the many benefits of trees for your community.

» Read more »

Dedicate a Tree

Planting a tree is one way to establish a living memorial that will bring peace, joy and security for generations. Likewise, the planting of a tree can be a gratifying act, which honors the memory of a friend or relative, or recognizes a special person or occasion.

» Celebrate »

Events See all

Save The Elms Program (STEP) Citizen Scientist Training

Sacramento Tree Foundation, Sacramento

Saturday, July 15 9:00A - 11:00A

Sacramento’s elm trees are disappearing! Join the Sacramento Tree Foundation and the City of Sacramento in monitoring our remaining public elms for the problematic Dutch elm disease (DED), a fungal disease with no known cure that has taken the lives of thousands of elms around Sacramento since the 1990s. DED-infected trees will be removed by the City to prevent the further spread of this unwelcome pest. This training will give you the knowledge, skills, and tools necessary to monitor elms for DED symptoms using your mobile device. STEP Citizen Scientists commit to monitoring selected elm trees three times between May and October.

Register Now

Caring for Your Mature Tree Workshop

Fremont Presbyterian Church, Sacramento

Saturday, July 22 10:00A - 12:00P

Join the River Park Tree Canopy Project at a presentation by certified arborist and UCCE Master Gardener Fran Clarke, one of the preeminent arborists in this region, who has years of experience helping homeowners succeed in caring for their trees as Stewardship Manager at the Sacramento Tree Foundation. You will learn the best practices for keeping your beautiful mature trees healthy and structurally sound.

Learn More

Sacramento: City of Trees? Addressing the Inequitable Distribution of our Region’s Urban Forest

West Sacramento Community Center, West Sacramento

Friday, July 28 8:30A - 10:30A

Recently, a new project launched by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) confirmed the long-held belief that Sacramento is the “City of Trees.” Using Google Maps’ street view data to measure tree cover in 17 cities around the globe, Sacramento was found to be number one in the United States and ranked third overall. While exciting news, there is still much work that needs to be done. Trees are integral to human health. People who reside in neighborhoods with more trees have lower rates of obesity, are more active, show lower levels of depression, and live longer lives. Unfortunately, the Sacramento Region suffers from stunning inequity when comparing the canopy cover of different neighborhoods, preventing many from reaping the benefits of our glorious canopy. Join us as we explore a brief history of Sacramento, highlighting the lack of investment in certain communities. Learn how urban greening dollars are working to build community engagement while expediting tree planting in under-canopied neighborhoods. Discuss how we can plan for the future, making sure that trees and green spaces are at the forefront during the design of new communities instead of merely an afterthought.

Learn More